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3/5/14 Seminar - Using Spatial Enabled Information to Analyze and Visualize Health Behaviors (Timothy J. Mulrooney, PhD and Garrett R. Love, PhD)

Presenting from North Carolina Central University

What
When Mar 05, 2014
from 12:00 am to 11:55 pm
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Using Spatial Enabled Information to Analyze and Visualize Health Behaviors

Abstract:

GIS (Geographic Information Systems) represents the hardware, software and methodology by which spatially-related information can be created, edited, analyzed and rendered in the digital environment.  This talk will focus specifically on the ways in which GIS can be used to represent health outcomes and behaviors locally, regionally and nationally.  It will also discuss the various data sources used in research, as well as examples from research undertaken by both NCCU faculty and students.

 

Biosketch:

Timothy Mulrooney is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences (DEEGS) at North Carolina Central University.  His specialty includes the science and practice of GIS (Geographic Information Systems), including GIS metadata standards, GIS education and subject areas in which GIS can be implemented at the college and high school level. Whether we realize it or not, we all use GIS in some form or another on a daily basis. Every phenomena has a spatial component and the democratization of GIS software and data can aid in a variety of different disciplines and communities within our city. He sees GIS as a powerful tool to bridge social science research with STEM disciplines and feels that GIS is an effective technical skill that can set job applicants apart from those who do not have these skills.  

Garrett Love is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences (DEEGS) at North Carolina Central University.  He teaches courses in Earth Science, Research Methods and Modeling.  His primary academic research area is in the field of computational mechanics, notably finite element methods for impact analysis.   More recently, he has developed research interests that support students in the Earth Science Master's program including remote detection of surface change and raster modeling using GIS.

 

Presentations:

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